The Gates of Troy by Glyn Iliffe

gatesoftroy

A little about the author of this masterful series on Odysseus and The Trojan War.

I’d like to say my early years were spent in libraries and book shops, hungry for novels to feed the fires of my youthful imagination.  Instead I spent most of it playing with Action Men in the back garden, knocking a cricket ball around the green in front of my house or exploring the local countryside with my cousins.  I’d always enjoyed writing, though, and dreamed of being an author since primary school.  The dream became an ambition after I read The Lord of the Rings at the age of 12.  I tried my hand at a couple of novels in my teens and early twenties but, after getting nowhere, decided I lacked the experience necessary to write something of worth.  So, with £2,000 and a ticket to Bombay, I set off to explore the world.  India was a shock, but after a couple of weeks of homesickness I began to appreciate the fact I was on an adventure.  Six months and several countries later I returned to England a different man – experienced, confident and broke.

The need for money drove me to a job packing tampons in a factory.  It was quite a low after the highs of trekking the Himalayas and hitch-hiking across North America.  But as luck would have it my neighbour on the production line had recently graduated and persuaded me to get a university education (not that he was a great advert, considering he, too, was packing tampons!)  I’d seen the light, though, and after studying A-level English at night school and adding this to my other lacklustre qualifications managed to secure a place on an English and Classics degree course at Reading University.  Three glorious years followed in which I was sucked into a world of Homer, Hesiod, Euripedes, Ovid, Virgil, Milton, Spencer and a host of others, as well as enjoying all the other benefits life at university can provide.  But when the end came I found myself once more broke – indebted, even – and in another unhappy job (this time working in a call centre).

It was then I decided to return to my youthful ambition to be an author.  The old adage is “write what you know”, so having spent three years studying Greek mythology I decided on a series of books telling the story of Odysseus.  That was 1999, when there weren’t any current novels about the ancient world.  After a long and bumpy journey – see the truth about being an author – I got my lucky break and King of Ithaca hit the bookshelves in 2008.  It’s been a busy time since then, balancing a job, a family with two young (and demanding) daughters, and my love-hate relationship with writing.  But I wouldn’t have it any other way!

http://www.glyniliffe.com/

My Review

Once again I found myself completely immersed in the lives of the heroes and the machinations of the gods as the story progresses from book 1, King of Ithaca.  It is ten years later and Helen has been taken from Sparta; Odysseus is bound by an oath he suggested and so is obligated to fulfill his promise to Agamemnon.  During those 10 years he has watched Ithaca thrive; has had 10 years of bliss with Penelope; has had a son born; and has no desire to leave.  Eperitus, his friend and champion, on the other hand grows restless as he has an indomitable warrior’s heart and spirit and longs to make an everlasting name for himself on the battlefield.  These are just two of the examples of the turmoil and tension that permeates the pages of this book.

The author’s treatment of Agamemnon and the sacrifice of Iphigenia is masterful and includes some nice plot twists that add to the suspense.  I also enjoyed the ways in which Paris and Hector were portrayed…not the less than flattering Orlando Bloom edition nor the insular thinking Eric Bana version.  Instead we find an accomplished warrior in Paris and a Hector who longs to expand his kingdom at the expense of the Greeks.

This is a most enjoyable take on the events preceding the invasion complete with Olympian interference and prophecies.  My favorite take away from book 2 is that there are books 3 and 4 waiting for me.  I look forward to spending the next ’20 years’ with Odysseus.  4 of 5 stars(well more like 4.5)  🙂

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2 thoughts on “The Gates of Troy by Glyn Iliffe

    • tigers68 December 28, 2013 / 8:49 am

      Thanks for the re-blog and follow.

      PB

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