The Daughters of Palatine Hill by Phyllis T. Smith

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The sequel to I Am Livia continues to follow the reign of Octavian/Augustus Caesar and is told from the perspective of three of the important women in his life; Livia, his wife; Julia, his daughter; and the daughter of Cleopatra and Antony, Cleopatra Selene.  Once again I was enthralled with the author’s ability to take a period of history and make it come alive with all of the emotion, the fears, the makings of a dynastic family amid constant turmoil.  The portrayals of the main figures in this at times triumphant; at times tragic tale, are redolent with realism; it could have happened this way.  Livia is a true help mate for Tavius; Julia a daughter whose frustration at being just a tool for her father searches for passion; Cleopatra Selene brought up with no hope of plotting her own future finds purpose and happiness.  The Daughters of Palatine Hill is a masterful rendition; the author possesses the knack for keeping the reader thoroughly entertained; a page turning delight as the story progresses to Julia’s banishment.  A well done tale indeed.  4.8 stars and a Hoover Book Review hope that there is more forthcoming from Phyllis T. Smith.

 

Fire and Steel – King’s Bane 1 by C.R. May

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The 6th century was a time of migration as many groups sought to better their prospects by moving to a more favorable location.  Of course, those favorable locations were either; already occupied, or being sought by more than one group.  This was especially true of northern Europe and the island of Britain.  Fire and Steel brings this migratory/conflict filled era to life in the person of an English/Angle/Engeln warrior, Eofer; nicknamed King’s Bane for his killing of the Swedish King during an attempt by the Swedes to migrate.  The English, under their king, Eomaer, are making plans to relocate from their home on the Jutland Peninsula to the bountiful, fertile island across the sea, Britannia but need to settle things with their enemies, The Jutes and The Danes first.  A tale packed with action; be it crashing shield walls, individual combat or heroic deeds, the author paints a picture filled with bloodied swords and spears but also the picture of the camaraderie of the ale house and the loyalty to one’s lord or king.  In King’s Bane 1, Mr.May has set the stage and I eagerly await the next act.  4.4stars