Triumph of a Tsar – by Tamar Anolic

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Triumph of a Tsar is an alternate historical rendering of the Russian Revolution in which the Romanovs survive and remain in power.  The young Prince Alexei becomes Tsar and faces many challenges as he cements his control over Russia against seeming impossible odds.  Not only does he have to prove he is capable of ruling, he has to survive assassination attempts, and his inherited hemophilia.  The author seamlessly weaves the history of post-WW1 into the fabric of her fictional what if. The reader is taken on a roller coaster ride through the turmoil of the times, the economic collapse of the late 20’s; the rise of Hitler’s Nazi Party in Germany; the continuing threat from the determined Communists. It is a heady mix of true history and a very plausible alternative. The author also provides the reader with an in depth look at the intricate and widespread influence of family among the Romanovs and their relatives. This proves to be a great source of strength to the young Alexei and a troublesome burden come WW2. An entertaining, and very enjoyable example of history looked at from the ‘what if’ perspective. 4 Stars

Note: Historical Fiction Reviews received a copy of Triumph of a Tsar in exchange for an honest review.

About the Author

“Triumph of a Tsar” is Tamar’s second novel. She has a history of writing about the Romanovs. Her first book, the nonfiction biography entitled “The Russian Riddle,” was the first biography of Grand Duke Sergei Alexandrovich. In addition, two of her short stories about the Grand Duke Konstantin Konstantinovich and his sons have been published: “Rumors of War” was published in The Copperfield Review in 2017 and “Before the Fire” was published in The Helix in 2018.

Tamar’s other works are not about the Romanovs. Her first novel, “The Last Battle,” was published in 2017. Her short story “Dark Night, Bright Sky,” was published in The Sandy River Review in 2018.

http://www.tamaranolic.com

 

 

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The Berlin Affair by David Boyle

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An interesting tale about the British Intelligence attempt to crack the German coding system known as Enigma.  Xanthe Schneider is a young American studying in England where she meets a member of Parliament who subsequently ends up in Berlin.  Is he betraying his country?  Xanthe is recruited to find out.  The story is entertaining as she makes contact with him, but conflicting emotions cloud her ability to do the job she was sent to do.  She also attracts the attention of the Gestapo and that element is a prime plot line that reaches a rather stunning conclusion.  All in all the story is well written and researched.  My only real complaint, valid or not, is that the book is too short.  Other than that it is a good read and I would recommend it to anyone interested in a spy thriller taking place in 1940 Berlin.  3.7 stars