The Great War Won: A Power of Recognized Superiority by James Emerson Loyd

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1918: The Great War, as it was already known, had reached an inflection point. The course of the war and the future of European civilization now rested on one decision: Would Germany, having prevailed in the east against a Russia crumbling into revolution and chaos, now attempt to crush her British and French enemies in one last desperate offensive before the emergent American Army arrived in its overwhelming force? Or could a small band of patriotic Germans led by a General and a Crown Prince use high position and influence to persuade their unyielding leadership to simply declare victory and withdraw homeward, leaving their opponents to justify a continuing and increasingly senseless slaughter?

Who Desires Peace…, the first book in the Great War Won trilogy, chronicled the schemes and adventures of the conspirators laying the foundations for their peace offensive. Book Two, …Should Prepare for War, began with the unleashing of Germany’s armies as peace talks with Bolshevist Russia fail. Several calls for a peaceful resolution to the war prove inconclusive, including an intrepid mission to meet face-to-face with the American General Black Jack Pershing. Finally, the tenuous state of inaction along the Western Front was shattered by first, an unexpected offensive, then a fierce German counterattack stopped only by the courage and vigor of the new American Expeditionary Force at Chateau Thierry and Belleau Wood.

Thus is set the stage for the final showdown between America and Germany in this Book Three, A Power of Recognized Superiority, opening with a devious scheme to disrupt the Allied rear with a flood of influenza-stricken prisoners and a distaff Fifth Column subversion by the radical Rosa Luxemburg and her unlikely comrade Estelle Vandenberg culminating in their arrest and imprisonment and an audacious rescue. Then Pershing’s American Expeditionary Force enters large-scale combat for the first time in the Saint-Mihiel salient and then the Meuse-Argonne sector. As the latter offensive slogs on bloodily, Germany begins to falter, then crumble, but her foes find themselves in desperate straits of their own as morale, manpower and a continuing slaughter take their toll.

Finally, an unexpected rapprochement brings the War to End All Wars to a fitful end, each power reckoning the loss of young men and treasure as their peoples ask themselves, Why?

REVIEW

So ends this fascinating, character driven, fictional rendered trilogy of “The War to End All Wars”. I cannot express enough about the cast of characters the author has either created, or the historical personages he imbued with such realism that one cannot help but think that this was what really happened. The depth of research done to pull together the various major parties involved; Lloyd George, Clemenceau, Black Jack Pershing, Woodrow Wilson, a young version of George Patton (I confess to hearing George C. Scott’s voice when Patton speaks 😊), etc; and in my mind the never at a loss for words Winston Churchill. I am not an expert on WW1, but I’m pretty sure that the author managed to touch upon every aspect of the doings of 1918; e.g. the influenza outbreak, the rise of the Bolsheviks, the rise of America as a super power, the effects on the German people, resulting in multiple plot lines which are seamlessly woven together in a captivating, page turning epic. My only real regret is that it took me three years to read the trilogy; not the author’s fault by any means, but because I have managed to acquire a huge to be read pile due to my humble, yet seemingly popular reviews. So, my fellow readers, it is without hesitation that I highly recommend The Great War Won in its entirety. 5 ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

The Great War Won: …Should Prepare for War by James Emerson Loyd

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BLURB

1918: The Great War, as it was already known, had reached an inflection point. The course of the war and the future of European civilization now rested on one decision: Would Germany, having prevailed in the East against a Russia crumbling into revolution and chaos, now attempt to crush her British and French foes in one last desperate offensive before the emergent American Army arrives in its overwhelming force?

Or could a small band of patriotic Germans led by a Crown Prince and a General use high position and influence to persuade their unyielding leadership to simply declare victory and withdraw homeward, leaving their opponents to justify a continuing and increasingly senseless slaughter?

Who Desires Peace…, the first book in The Great War Won trilogy, chronicled the schemes and adventures of the conspirators laying the foundations of their peace offensive. In this Book Two, …Should Prepare for War, their story begins with the historic peace negotiations with Leon Trotsky and the new government of Bolshevik Russia, followed by the unleashing of Germany’s armies as those talks fail. An unexpected plea for help propels a German team into the heart of Saint Petersburg in search of an imprisoned American notable, then several calls for a peaceful resolution to the war prove inconclusive, including an intrepid mission to meet face-to-face with the American General Black Jack Pershing.

Finally, the tenuous state of inaction along the Western Front is shattered by first, an unexpected Allied offensive, then a fierce German counterattack stopped only by the extraordinary courage and vigor of the new American Expeditionary Force at Chateau Thierry and Belleau Wood, setting the stage for the final showdown between Germany and America in Book Three, A Power of Recognized Superiority.

REVIEW

A thoroughly engaging look at WW1, book 2 of the series continues the exploits of the fictional General von Treptow and his attempts to bring the war to an end. As in the first book, I was taken in by the number of events that take place, the plots and subplots that drive the narrative…but what good are those story lines without interesting characters to make those events happen…what good are those interesting characters without believable dialogue? Well my peeps and fellow travelers, you need not fret over those aspects of the story. The characters are lifelike, some even larger than life…the dialogue is full of the sharp repartee, the clever retort, the belligerent espousing of opinion…an example – a meeting of David Lloyd George, Churchill, and Teddy Roosevelt (and others):

“thoroughly pissed Prime Minister rose to depart. “Well, then, perhaps not the King today. Arthur, Henry, we shall take our leave. Thank you, Lord Elsmere, for your hospitality. Winston, I should very much like to see you at Number Ten. Four this afternoon. Arthur, please see to your Dutch colleague. Good day, Colonel Roosevelt.” As the Englishmen trooped out, Balfour gave a shrug with his backward glance. Roosevelt turned to Churchill, “Winston, was it something I said?”

An excellent sequel that will keep you turning the pages (or swiping your Kindle). Intrigue, adventure, danger, and even love await you amidst the turmoil of a cataclysmic world changing event. 5 stars

 

 

The Great War Won-Who Desires Peace by James Emerson Loyd

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A meticulously researched tale of WW1, The Great War Won is a page turning look at the year 1918 and the behind the scenes machinations of the various powers attempting to end the war. The tale is told mainly through the eyes of a German Intelligence Officer, General Von Treptow, though not exclusively as Britain’s Minister of Munitions, Churchill, and the newly arrived American commander, General Black Jack Pershing are also part of the narrative.  The characters are a joy to read; from those in the military to the many civilians involved in the action and suspense.  Fast paced action, witty repartee and a historical perspective that delves into the collapse of Russia and the rise of the many Socialist/Bolshevik factions seeking to destroy the world order makes for not only an entertaining read, but an informative one as well.  While the plots, subplots, and various twists and turns thereof kept this reader enthralled, I was also taken by the flashbacks to points earlier in the War – the Churchill encounter during The Battle of the Somme is but one fine example of background character development utilized by the author.

I didn’t know what to expect when I was approached to read and review this story (the first of a trilogy).  WW1 hasn’t typically been an era I usually read about, but Mr Loyd has reeled me in.  I will definitely be reading the remaining two book in the series.  4.7 Stars