Return to Ithaca by Glyn Iliffe

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It is with a great sadness that I say goodbye to Odysseus and company (for the time being).  This epic series, so brilliantly conceived and written, has come to it’s conclusion.  Throughout my life of reading I have periodically gone back and reread a book or a series of books.  This practice has been decidedly put on hold the last few years as my humble book reviewing blog has garnered the attention of many authors who now ask me to read and review their work.  That coupled with my own novel writing has put a crimp in going back to reread any of my favorites.  The Adventures of Odysseus series may change that.  Whether it is because ancient Greek history was my first love or because the author has written some damned good books, I will be rereading this series.

The story of Odysseus comes to a close as he returns to Ithaca to reclaim his home, his throne and his family.  The emotional roller coaster ride the main characters experience is the highlight of this volume.  Odysseus, Eperitus, Telemachus and Penelope go through the gamut of doubt and fear; hope and happiness as they battle the scheming suitors for the right to rule.  The story is well known and it is a credit to the author for taking it and making it his own, giving the reader a fresh look at this ancient tale.  5 stars

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A Song of War by Christian Cameron,Libbie Hawker,Kate Quinn,Vicky Alvear Shecter,Stephanie Thorton,SJA Turney&Russell Whitfield

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Sing to me oh Muse of black hulled ships full of prideful, hubristic, greedy Achaean’s and the prideful, hubristic, ill-fated Trojans.  In this collaborative novel of the Trojan War, the authors have produced a most entertaining version of the well known tale; giving voice to not only the principles involved (Helen, Paris, Hector, Achilles, etc, etc) but to some of the lesser known but still important characters (Hellenus, Cassandra, Philoctetes, etc, etc).  The authors also give some refreshing insight into the mindsets of the protagonists they were responsible for.  I had to laugh as I read Russell Whitfield’s author’s note as he hoped that some would find his Agamemnon to be pitied rather than reviled.  I laughed because after I read his chapter, I made a note stating that Whitfield almost had me feeling sorry for the bastard.  🙂   The H Team, as they call themselves, have combined their talents once again to produce a story that is imaginative, entertaining and just plain good.  Everything ties together as the story unfolds from the “abduction” of Helen to the heart rending sack of Troy and the escape of Aeneas.  Seven songs from seven authors; seven songs that would make Homer and Virgil proud.  4.8 stars and the highly acclaimed Hoover Book Reviews “When will the next collaboration be written?” award.

The Oracles of Troy by Glyn Iliffe

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To quote the eminent philosopher and all around wise man, Homer Simpson, “I like stories.”  I especially like good stories and this series by Glyn Iliffe is magnificent.  The Oracles of Troy is the 4th book in this engaging tale of Odysseus and his fictional captain, Eperitus and the ten year war between the Greeks and the Trojans.  The war is basically a stalemate in this tenth year and the Greeks are losing heart and long for their homeland; a homeland that is becoming increasingly more chaotic without the kings and leaders there to govern.  This is especially true in the kingdom of Ithaca where Odysseus’ wife Penelope is barely keeping a group of ambitious nobles from taking the reins away from the rightful ruling family.  Enter the three oracles, the pieces needed for a Greek victory and the tale of how Odysseus and companions go about to fulfill the three conditions given by the gods.

The author, not only in this book but in the whole series, does for the myths and stories of Odysseus in the same manner that Mary Renault does for Theseus in The King Must Die, etc, though in this case the supernatural intervention of the gods, in particular Athena is much in evidence.  Mr. Iliffe does a masterful job of humanizing the Homeric heroes while allowing the gods to have their place as well.  These mythic, larger than life characters are portrayed with all of their doubts, worries, ambitions and faults.  We have a tale not only of the glory and honor of battle and war but the human failings of betrayal and greed; the human feelings of love and desire.  This is a wonderful telling of a wonderful tale.  5 stars and a hearty Hoover Book Review recommendation.

P.S. I inquired of the author of a possible 5th book to chronicle Odysseus’ journey home…am happy to say that it is in the works.  🙂

The Armour of Achilles by Glyn Iliffe

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I must say at the outset that anytime an author can take a well known, pretty much been done every which way tale and imbue it with a knack of rekindling interest in the time worn saga, then said author has done something special.  This is the third volume in this series and we find our mythic heroes in the tenth year of the war with no end in sight.  The main participants, Odysseus, Achilles, Agamemnon, Hector, Helen; well the list goes on…they are brought to life with all of their fears and doubts as well as the twin cornerstones of the conflict, pride and honor. The conflict rages not only on the battlefields but in the hearts and minds of the combatants…so much tension…so many paths and decisions to make.  The author has crafted a wonderful take on The Trojan War, a take with many plots and surprises along the way while at the same time replaying the familiar scenes, such as Achilles and Agamemnon’s feud or the battle between Achilles and Hector in a way that makes them fresh and exciting.

I mark this series as a must read….5 stars

 

The Gates of Troy by Glyn Iliffe

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A little about the author of this masterful series on Odysseus and The Trojan War.

I’d like to say my early years were spent in libraries and book shops, hungry for novels to feed the fires of my youthful imagination.  Instead I spent most of it playing with Action Men in the back garden, knocking a cricket ball around the green in front of my house or exploring the local countryside with my cousins.  I’d always enjoyed writing, though, and dreamed of being an author since primary school.  The dream became an ambition after I read The Lord of the Rings at the age of 12.  I tried my hand at a couple of novels in my teens and early twenties but, after getting nowhere, decided I lacked the experience necessary to write something of worth.  So, with £2,000 and a ticket to Bombay, I set off to explore the world.  India was a shock, but after a couple of weeks of homesickness I began to appreciate the fact I was on an adventure.  Six months and several countries later I returned to England a different man – experienced, confident and broke.

The need for money drove me to a job packing tampons in a factory.  It was quite a low after the highs of trekking the Himalayas and hitch-hiking across North America.  But as luck would have it my neighbour on the production line had recently graduated and persuaded me to get a university education (not that he was a great advert, considering he, too, was packing tampons!)  I’d seen the light, though, and after studying A-level English at night school and adding this to my other lacklustre qualifications managed to secure a place on an English and Classics degree course at Reading University.  Three glorious years followed in which I was sucked into a world of Homer, Hesiod, Euripedes, Ovid, Virgil, Milton, Spencer and a host of others, as well as enjoying all the other benefits life at university can provide.  But when the end came I found myself once more broke – indebted, even – and in another unhappy job (this time working in a call centre).

It was then I decided to return to my youthful ambition to be an author.  The old adage is “write what you know”, so having spent three years studying Greek mythology I decided on a series of books telling the story of Odysseus.  That was 1999, when there weren’t any current novels about the ancient world.  After a long and bumpy journey – see the truth about being an author – I got my lucky break and King of Ithaca hit the bookshelves in 2008.  It’s been a busy time since then, balancing a job, a family with two young (and demanding) daughters, and my love-hate relationship with writing.  But I wouldn’t have it any other way!

http://www.glyniliffe.com/

My Review

Once again I found myself completely immersed in the lives of the heroes and the machinations of the gods as the story progresses from book 1, King of Ithaca.  It is ten years later and Helen has been taken from Sparta; Odysseus is bound by an oath he suggested and so is obligated to fulfill his promise to Agamemnon.  During those 10 years he has watched Ithaca thrive; has had 10 years of bliss with Penelope; has had a son born; and has no desire to leave.  Eperitus, his friend and champion, on the other hand grows restless as he has an indomitable warrior’s heart and spirit and longs to make an everlasting name for himself on the battlefield.  These are just two of the examples of the turmoil and tension that permeates the pages of this book.

The author’s treatment of Agamemnon and the sacrifice of Iphigenia is masterful and includes some nice plot twists that add to the suspense.  I also enjoyed the ways in which Paris and Hector were portrayed…not the less than flattering Orlando Bloom edition nor the insular thinking Eric Bana version.  Instead we find an accomplished warrior in Paris and a Hector who longs to expand his kingdom at the expense of the Greeks.

This is a most enjoyable take on the events preceding the invasion complete with Olympian interference and prophecies.  My favorite take away from book 2 is that there are books 3 and 4 waiting for me.  I look forward to spending the next ’20 years’ with Odysseus.  4 of 5 stars(well more like 4.5)  🙂

My Q&A with author Glyn Iliffe for the HNS

A great series…

STEVEN A. McKAY

http://historicalnovelsociety.org/glyn-iliffe-talks-with-steven-mckay-about-the-oracles-of-troy-book-four-in-his-best-selling-adventures-of-odysseus-series/#.Ume-M_U8vh0.facebook

Glyn’s new book, The Oracles of Troy, is out on Friday – check out the Q&A I did with him for the Historical Novel Society

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King of Ithaca by Glyn Iliffe

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King of Ithaca is the first book in this series about the Greek warrior and hero Odysseus.  The story begins with Laertes still the King but there is a revolt brewing that threatens to remove Laertes and his line as the royal family.  Odysseus is consulting the oracle on Mt. Parnassus about his future.  It is this journey where he meets the other main protagonist of the book, Eperitus, an exiled prince looking to find glory under a new lord.  The Odysseus in this story is not portrayed in the Homeric mode but is rather more human than mythic.  His crafty like nature is not some spur of the moment inspiration, instead Odysseus wrestles with each problem to find solutions.  There is doubt and anguish involved in the process.  This very human quality is found in all of the characters involved including the three main women in the story, Helen, Penelope and the most formidable of them, Clytaemnestra.

In juxtaposition to the human equation we find a taste of the Olympians mainly in the portrayal of Athena.  She has promised to lend her aid to Odysseus in his quest to reclaim the throne of Ithaca but you know Olympians, they can be a bit fickle at times and Odysseus knows this.

There are many scenes of action, battles with human foes and one with a monster in the mythic tradition, and a sort of humorous scene of the hero Ajax entering the hall of Tyndareus in Sparta.  He reminded me somewhat of Angus Donald’s Little John but on steroids.  There are also a few well placed quirks in the story line that make one pause for a second to negotiate an unexpected turn in the road.  It is a very enjoyable account of my favorite Greek hero, Odysseus and look forward to continuing his story in the sequel.  This book rates a strong 4 stars.